The Oddity Of Amazon Author Central UK

The Oddity Of Amazon Author Central UK

Why is UK Amazon Author Central different? As I live in a country that does not have its own Amazon Kindle Store, my default store is Amazon Kindle US, so when I check my ebooks, it is always from their listings on the US store. As an author, I also naturally have my own Author Central page on Amazon, and from there I can check rankings and reviews. But quite by accident this morning, I made a very odd discovery. I went to my KDP Dashboard and clicked on one of my ebooks, but instead of choosing the US store link, I inadvertently clicked the UK store link. What surprised

Publishing Using A Pen Name

Publishing Using A Pen Name

There are many reasons writers choose to use a pen name for one or more books. Usually, it’s because of a complete change of genre or perhaps the topic matter is too far removed from what their loyal readers expect from authors they have read. If an author is well known for children books, perhaps a radical change to romantica would be a good reason to adopt a pen name or nom de plume. If you are publishing with Kindle, KDP makes it very easy to do this. It’s as simple as changing the author’s name under the Contributors section when you are preparing the book for publication. When your book

The Trouble With Writing

The Trouble With Writing

Writing is a bit like cooking. The more you do it, the better you get at it. If I think back to my first attempts at writing, oh, and my first attempts at cooking, I can look back and laugh until my sides split. While writing seems to many like such a natural thing to do, many miss the fact that it takes a long time to understand what good writing is all about. I admit to being a very slow learner, so it took me a few books to understand that writing is not about writing a series of nicely spelt words and sentences with impeccable grammar – though

You Are With Amazon – Or Die

You Are With Amazon – Or Die

Is Amazon KDP Select the best publishing choice? I have been doing a lot of hand-wringing recently about moving all of my ebooks into Amazon’s Kindle Direct Publishing Select programme, and by doing so, granting Amazon exclusive rights to my ebooks. I wrote about this in my last post, Should I Publish Exclusively With Amazon? Yet my dilemma is small fry compared to the decisions that major publishers have to make each time their distribution contracts come up for renewal with Amazon. The latest battle of the giants was between HarperCollins and Amazon, which followed a similar episode of tooth gnashing, threats and miles of editorial argument when it was the turn