Forty-Two

42 Forty-Two

We all know that the number 42 is made famous in the novel The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams. The Answer to the Ultimate Question of Life, the Universe, and Everything is calculated by an enormous supercomputer over a period of 7.5 million years to be 42. But just how famous is this oddly even little number? I thought I would investigate. Perhaps Adams was influenced by reading Lewis Carroll? Examples of Carroll’s use of 42: # Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland has 42 illustrations. # Rule Forty-two in Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland (“All persons more than a mile high to leave the court”.) # Rule 42 of

Douglas

Douglas Adams

It really was quite unsociable of Douglas Adams to leave planet Earth in 2001. And without as much as a goodbye either. It was a real pity. There were still so many unanswered question left for him to ponder, dissect, analyze and debunk. He also left without giving me his insights into these unfathomable questions. The reason I bring up Douglas now, is that I have noticed in the years since his departure, a slow and systematic demise of one of my favorite forms of literature. Vogon poetry. There seems to be fewer, and fewer poets brave enough to attempt this unique form of poetry. Is it the fear of