Flower Petal, Or Flower’s Petal?

Flower Petal, Or Flower’s Petal?

The possessive adjective in English must be the most difficult grammar to master. When is it a plain old adjective such as a car door? Or is that really a compound noun? When is it possessive as in a hair’s breadth? Is it a woman’s leg, or a woman leg? Or is at a chair’s leg, or a chair leg? There are many examples of this confusing English grammar point. You would say the tree’s leaves, a butcher’s hook, a horse’s tail. Or you could say a bottle top, a door handle, a computer screen, day break, mountain top. There is an obtuse grammatical explanation about ownership and being part

The Longest Sentence In English

The Longest Sentence In English

How long can one sentence be? For some odd reason, I started searching for the longest sentence ever written in English and was amazed to find that in fact, a sentence of 469,375.2 words was actually written by Nigel Tomm in a book titled The Blah Story that had twenty-three different covers, which must surely be a record for covers and words, although I’m absolutely perplexed as to what would constitute a word that would only count as point two of a word as a word is a word and any reduction would have to be classed as a suffix or abbreviation or perhaps an acronym but one could surmise that his over-use of

Playing With Writing

Playing With Writing

Have fun with your words Writing always seems to be such a serious business. Novels, articles, technical documents, journalism plus one hundred other serious applications of this worthiest of arts. Being a pedantic member of the grammar police and spelling firing squad, I also take my métier very seriously. Paying strict attention to my use of each part of speech in its correct form and ensuring I keep my register under strict control. Well, except for today because today I feel like having complete and utter nonsensical fun with words. Ready? Well, ready or not, here we go! Maxwell Miser mixed metaphors most Monday mornings – mainly mundane – mostly mashed. Annie

Said Harry Potter – Harry Potter Said

Said Harry Potter – Harry Potter Said

How do you use dialogue tags? Dialogue tags must be the most written about and discussed structure in a writer’s grammatical toolbox. One that I haven’t mentioned before as I didn’t want to join the long and probably never ending debate. However, after getting close to finishing reading the third Harry Potter book, (yes I know I’m a bit late in doing so) I just can’t keep my opinion quiet any longer. I am also readying myself for brutal Vandal reader disagreement here, but I just don’t like dialogue tags with the verb before the subject, which J.K. uses almost without fail. Except when she can’t. ‘Let’s go,’ said Harry.