Flower Petal, Or Flower’s Petal?

Flower Petal, Or Flower’s Petal?

The possessive adjective in English must be the most difficult grammar to master. When is it a plain old adjective such as a car door? Or is that really a compound noun? When is it possessive as in a hair’s breadth? Is it a woman’s leg, or a woman leg? Or is at a chair’s leg, or a chair leg? There are many examples of this confusing English grammar point. You would say the tree’s leaves, a butcher’s hook, a horse’s tail. Or you could say a bottle top, a door handle, a computer screen, day break, mountain top. There is an obtuse grammatical explanation about ownership and being part

K-nowledge

K-nowledge

Did you K-now that the silent K in words like K-nee and K-nickK-nack was actually pronounced in Old English. For some reason however, people could not get the K-nack of pronouncing the K as well as the N. So the K sound got K-nocked off. People got all K-notted up and tongue tied when they tried to say what they K-new about K-nives and K-nitting. The K-now-it-alls of the time tried to keep the K, but even the K-nights were dropping their K’s so it was the death K-nell of the pronounced K. Many of the K-naves had dropped it well before, as they K-nuckled down to K-neeling for the

Funny English

Funny English

It’s fun learning a new language. But sometimes trying to use direct word for word translation can result in some very funny expressions! Private school: NO TRESPASSING WITHOUT PERMISSION. Hotel bedroom, Japan: GUESTS ARE REQUESTED NOT TO SMOKE OR DO OTHER DISGUSTING BEHAVIOURS IN BED. Doctor’s surgery, Rome: SPECIALIST IN WOMEN AND OTHER DISEASES. Cocktail lounge, Norway: LADIES ARE REQUESTED NOT TO HAVE CHILDREN IN THE BAR. Hotel, Acapulco: THE MANAGER HAS PERSONALLY PASSED ALL THE WATER SERVED HERE. Hotel airconditioner instructions, Japan: COOLES AND HEATES: IF YOU WANT CONDITION OF WARM AIR IN YOUR ROOM, PLEASE CONTROL YOURSELF. Zoo, Hungary: PLEASE DO NOT FEED THE ANIMALS. IF YOU HAVE

Spot The Schwa!

Spot The Schwa!

The most common sound when we make in English is called the Schwa. It represents up to 15% of our utterances. However, so few people have heard of it. It’s the sound we make when we say ‘cup of tea’, and really say ‘cuppa tea’. It’s this little ‘uh’ sound we use in this example that is the schwa and in phonetics, an upside down ‘e’ is used to represent the schwa. Now have fun finding this common but very small sound. A curvaceous young phoneme called schwa, Said “I never feel strong. It’s bizarre! I’m retiring and meek, And I always sound weak, But in frequency counts – I’m