A Drunken Meeting With a Dead Author

A Drunken Meeting With a Dead Author

Oh Douglas, why did you up and leave us? I had the occasion, albeit under the very heavy influence of a bottle or three of an extremely pleasant Shiraz, to stumble upon a rather tall gentleman with an odd outlook on life. Well, odd in the fact that he was rumoured to be dead, but we’ll come to that shortly. Although unsure at first, the presence of a towel slung casually over his left shoulder, a large open and half eaten packet of salted peanuts in his right hand and his asking if I had any beer gave me a clue. When I casually said, ‘Hey, you’re supposed to be

Douglas Adams – The Art of Words in a Cunning Order

Douglas Adams – The Art of Words in a Cunning Order

The man who wrote words in a cunning order. This post is a little wander down memory lane for my favourite author of all time. Hopefully, with a few facts about him, which you may not know, plus a few classic quotes, which you may. But his most important quote, of course, was that he wrote words in a cunning order. Douglas Noel Adams (11 March 1952 – 11 May 2001) was an English writer, humorist, and dramatist. Adams is best known as the author of The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, which originated in 1978 as a BBC radio comedy before developing into a “trilogy” of five books that sold

‘February The Fifth’: Doug Adams Meets Dan Brown — Sorta

February The Fifth by Derek Haines

Review: FEBRUARY THE FIFTH (CreateSpace 2010) Author: Derek Haines A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away … no, that’s a whole ‘nuther movie. This book takes place in the future. In a place that has no less than 12 sun systems. Twelve, as in the number of months in the calendar. Aha! The rulers of this empire comprised of the 12 sun systems are a Gregorian clan with names taken from said same calendar. Got that? :) In other words, February the Fifth is a person. In fact, February is the person who ends up becoming successor as the new “Supreme Potentate,” aka, leader of the empire

Forty-Two

42 Forty-Two

We all know that the number 42 is made famous in the novel The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams. The Answer to the Ultimate Question of Life, the Universe, and Everything is calculated by an enormous supercomputer over a period of 7.5 million years to be 42. But just how famous is this oddly even little number? I thought I would investigate. Perhaps Adams was influenced by reading Lewis Carroll? Examples of Carroll’s use of 42: # Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland has 42 illustrations. # Rule Forty-two in Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland (“All persons more than a mile high to leave the court”.) # Rule 42 of